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john allen has return to afghanistan to exhume his duties more than a week after the pentagon says it is investigating him for what he -- what they call an appropriate occasions with a woman linked to the david petraeus scandal. general allan was expected to testify before a senate committee last thursday on his nomination to become the commander of u.s.-european command and the top nato general. that nomination has been put on hold. finally, president obama pardons' the national thanksgiving turkey this afternoon at a white house ceremony. the tradition started back in 1963 with president john kennedy. those are some of the latest headlines on cspan radio. [video clip] the name of this place still resonates with the shuddering in the hearts of the american people. more than any other name connected to the civil war except lincoln's, a gettysburg reverberates and americans retain knowledge that what happened here was the crux of our terrible national trial and even americans who were not sure what precisely transpired on the skills know the glory and all the tragedy we associate wi
the sequestered . but did so by impacted the pentagon less heavily than the sequestered it. but divided government, i think you get the question. president said he does not want to change the money for the pentagon. mitch mcconnell said we are not raising taxes to ransom the pentagon budget cuts. a lot of focus has been on the pentagon but these are more concerned about the $50 billion in domestic discretionary spending restraint every year. you did to the republican study committee. the announced all a thing worse than sequestration would not be having savings. this stampede attempted did not take. he denied a demand that the defense budget be remain untouched, either of the public opinion or the house. i think sequestration happens. the only thing i could imagine is if they -- the r's and d's would both rather take it out of entitlements rather than the annual budgets. could they cut a deal where they save the same amount of money but out of entitlements? that is the only compromise i could see. then you get to the grand bargain idea. it seems every time i have these conversations were people as
there and 100,000 u.s. paid contractors paid by the pentagon still occupying afghanistan. the one change we have seen this year has been the withdrawal of the troops from iraq. that was the centerpiece from where u.s. troops were fighting around the world. now, we're looking at afghanistan as the biggest war zone that is acknowledged. the interesting thing that makes it difficult for people like you and i who want to look at where the u.s. troops are, the lists that we see are a very hard to actually get good information. i was looking yesterday at a few different lists on the pentagon's web sites. one of them is a list of personnel where are u.s. shoulders are. there are about 195,000 u.s. soldiers and marines that are based around the world. we hear in general they are in about 150 countries. when you look at the list, there is only about 40 countries listed. why is that? we are only listing the countries where there is more than 100 troops permanently based there. that is kind of weird because that means is only about 1/4 of the country -- about 1/5 of the countries where we have troops are m
and the unique experience even at the pentagon and security advisor to the president. he made an early point i was familiar with based on my experience with 35 years of congress that we have all these different agencies and departments and people all over the government as well as congress that had parts of the energy package that never had a way to take a look at what should be our policy and came up with this idea the council to recommend here comeau recalled the different departments chaired by the department of energy and secretary in agencies that reach out to all the interested parties to make sure their views take consideration. but it is royal energy review. it's very different from what they do at the pentagon. with this technique but it's helpful and it will be hall posters talk about a strategy in the broader view through the quaternary old report to really get into details. and the congress of course we've got all these different committees as part of the jurisdiction. i had a simple solution. i called the two minute she -- saint pete, we need some, but not. every now and then i wo
the pentagon hoping to force the military to drop its policy that excludes them from thousands of ground combat positions. all four women are veterans of the war in iraq and afghanistan. they main the combat exclusion role is discriminatory. >> the policy limits my future in the marine corps. i would be assigned to positions based on my gender rather than on my qualifications or my accomplishments. this didn't make sense personally or politically and it did not make sense for the military. >> she also says this prevents commanders from deciding the best way to fight. >>> so what would you do with $500 million? that's tonight's record-shattering powerball jackpot expected to climb higher. millions of americans in 42 states are trying to parlay $2 into half a billion. alison kosik is live from times square this morning. what's happening there? 60% of ticket sales are expected to be made today. we know the odds are pretty slim, but people are still going for it. >> reporter: they are still going for it. you know, you talk about the odds, the odds are slim. 175 million to 1 are the odds that you'll
thursday on c-span 2. >> defense secretary leon panetta looks at how budget cuts could affect the pentagon. we spoke tuesday evening at the center for new american security about the fiscal cliff and fed priorities. >> thank you for coming. it is an honor to be back and an honor to be introducing my old boss. as you know, secretary of the net debt is one of the most respected and experienced hands in washington. his resume is legendary. chairman of the budget committee back in the day when they actually passed a budget, director of the office of management and budget, and chief of staff to president clinton when the white house, director of the central intelligence agency, and now secretary of defense, so the question is what in the world are you going to do next. this extraordinary resume does not do justice to the man. leon panetta is a wonderful human being and in some ways a man of contrasts. i am going to give you examples. he is known among his counterparts around the world for his warm italian bear hugs. he is also known for the laser light focus he displayed on hunting down osama b
in the future. host: what would the pentagon cut if sequestration happen? guest: 9.4% cut, so it is on the order of $500 billion a little bit more. about half over all, over 10- year cuts in spending. it is a significant cut. host: going back to what we started with, they have not said specifically what they were looking at or bay -- have given the public some idea? guest: they said, first of all, but would be almost, but -- unavoidable to have furloughs. certainly contracts spending would be cut. the president had an option to exempt troops, the impact on their pay and he indicated he would exercise the option if that happens, so that would not be on the table. but there would definitely be cuts in weapons systems, contract and, and civilian furloughs. host: burlington, north carolina. republican caller. caller: i think we all have to agree -- in a sense that we are all in agreement -- that something needs to happen. but we already have the tools in place. we have bowles-simpson, which was an idea. the fear is that nothing is going to get done until january. there was little to no talk about cu
.i.a. amid scandal. there could also be big changes at the pentagon. as well at state department. whoever the president chooses, it could impact, for example, the use of armed drones taking out al qaeda overseas. and lots of other security matters. and now, a fox news contributeor and pollster joining us, and former senior advisor to senator john mccain. the use of the unmanned drones to take out terrorists who want to murder americans, on its face it should be a no-brainer but national security appears to be politicized. >> that is right. to their credit the obama administration in the days up to the election were trying to codify the rules and regulations for making those difficult decisions. however, we are alonging at the possibility of massive defense cuts. we have new personnel, as you suggested, coming in potentially to state, defense, and c.i.a., and we have our whole national security apparatus being overhauled at a time when we are in great peril as reporting from the middle east, particularly gaza strip and israel suggests. >>gregg: president obama, it can be said, has a checke
the sequester, that's good, less spending. i'm in favor of looking at the pentagon spending and reforming how you get it and get the same amount of dollars. look at the government spending. >> not a common republican position. >> more common than you think, but it's not common in the appropriations committee that does armed services. i talked to one of the key guys over there and said how can i help you reform the pentagon? there must have been -- >> i bet congressmen love getting that call, grover norquist, how can i help? >> i start meetings that way. want to make the government more efficient, make it cost less and we are everybody's friend on that subject. ralph nader and i were lobbying the bush administration back in 2001. >> what about the second cliff, the bush tax cuts? >> i think -- you get towards the end in a thing and if the republicans have played it right, they said look, push it out a month or two weeks so you should never actually go over these things, just as you do with continuing resolutions. say, look, give it a week, two months. >> the president is not going to extend. h
, it is action the pentagon last week, a woman said i had my first kid -- i say to buy vacation and sick days and use them all up. even in the federal government, we need paid leave. i think beyond that, high- quality accessible daycare. i do not understand why that is not much more of a political issue than it is. those will in fact all women -- most of us in the room can manage without the last one. we can buy it or find it, but it ought to be far more general and accessible for those who cannot afford it. those issues cover the waterfront. there are other issues that do not. the kind of flexibility i am talking about will be very helpful for women who have a shot at leadership positions and might allow women to stay in the game so that when you have kids and need to do work differently you do not give up on the career you train for an educated for and started for and are still eligible for leadership down the road. flexibility for people at the bottom of the chain can mean something really different -- it can mean you work 15 or 20 hours a week and you work a very unusual times. you saw th
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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